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THE PROJECT HIMALAYA – JAPAN

21 February 2018

at 21:17 by john

Our Japanese guests arrived late on the evening that India had beaten Pakistan in the cricket as we waited for them in the airport there was a big uproar, more horn tooting than usual, fireworks and general crazy festivities in the street.

Mr.Iwata a 17th generation tea farmer with a tiny tea garden near Kobe in Japan, was here to improve his understanding of black tea and to share his expertise in green tea.

Mr.Takeda a semi-retired tea-scientist and president of one of Japan’s most respected research institutes who has spent his life developing plants for the Japanese tea industry.

They were accompanied by Pierre our trusty translator/ interpreter, an eccentric sword smith who has lived for many years in Japan and his wife Rina.

We drove into town and, once checked in to the hotel, went out for a late night stroll through the streets of Kolkata, their first experience of India. We stopped for a traditional clay cupped chai which they enjoyed, breaking the disposable cups on the ground with great enthusiasm. Though tired, they all seemed excited and game for anything.

The next day for breakfast I pulled out a fresh sample of exceptional Darjeeling Thurbo, tasting the fresh nectar their eyes widened, the notebooks were out and the questions began to flow…

We spent the day travelling to Darjeeling. Checked in to the charming old Darjeeling Planter’s Club and then to my very good friend JP Gurung’s house for supper.

JP Gurung is one of Darjeeling’s most senior tea consultants. The son of a tea planter who, having managed many gardens for many years, now advises as a private consultant. As the Indian expert of our project he was to accompany us to Nepal the next day.

Setting up this project I had wondered whether the ‘friendly exchange’ I was hoping for was possible between people of such vastly different cultures. However JP’s warm hospitality and comfortable living room, the log-fire burning in the grate, a pot of wonderfully floral First Flush Darjeeling (and a few glasses of something a little stronger) and our shared passion for tea had us in deep discussion within minutes. It wasn’t long before the jokes were flowing and it was clear that everyone was there to make the most of it.

The following day was spent on the road and crossing the border into Nepal. Arriving late in the village of Fikkal we met our host Mr.Rai at the Nepal Small Tea Farmers factory which is a large, industrial-sized, factory owned as a co-operative by 750 small farmers, quite unique in Nepal. Fresh leaf is purchased daily from the local tea-farmers by weight and transformed into Darjeeling-style orthodox black teas. It is one of the projects that JP supervises in Fikkal. His other interest here is a tiny factory a few minutes up the road that makes artisanal green, black and wulong teas with a selection of small Japanese machines. Between these two very different tea factories we were to spend the following days exchanging knowledge and manufacturing both green and black teas together…. ……

To be continued in Kevin’s next blog….’To be continued in Kevin’s next blog….’

PROJECT HIMALAYA – JAPAN 2011

PROJECT HIMALAYA – JAPAN 2011

PROJECT HIMALAYA – JAPAN 2011

PROJECT HIMALAYA – JAPAN 2011

PROJECT HIMALAYA – JAPAN 2011

PROJECT HIMALAYA – JAPAN 2011

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Our suggestions to beat the winter blues

at 12:22 by Social

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Winter is in full swing but beautiful snow-covered landscapes and slightly longer days are not always enough against the effect that the dark and cold have on our bodies and spirits.

So here are some ideas from the Camellia Sinensis team to add a little comfort to these cold winter days.

“For me, it’s the Long Jing Zhejiang and M.Xu’s Bai Hao…the former is green, vivifying and helps concentration while the latter is comforting, woodsy and fruity. Either way, both delicious!” – Francois Marchand

“To beat the blues, I put on some reggae and pour myself a good Wulong from the Wuyi mountains!” – Sebastien Colin

“The 2007 PuEr Lao Ban Zhang: it’s instantly comforting and soothing. It has a warm welcome and an essence of outdoors: the noble woods, camphor or even pine trees of the forest. A perfect tea to savour during a snow storm” – Laurence Lambin-Gagnon

“If you’re looking for after-ski comfort, look no further than a 1992 Menghai Hou Gen Pu Er Sheng” – Jasmin Desharnais

“I fill up my thermos with Bai Rui Xiang, put on my cross-country skis, and head out late at night with a few friends to enjoy the moonlight” – Kevin Gascoyne

“I often recommend to clients the high mountain Taiwanese wulongs as “winter teas”. The vegetal yellow liquor is well textured and also, it’s a tea that’s best infused with boiling water (as opposed to some green teas that range 75-85 degrees)” – Sabrina Catellier

“The only thing better than staying warm inside with a “Clark” chai mix from Bristol Chai with some soothing sounds of Suzie Arioli and Jordan Officer, is adding a fire place?” – Jean-Francois Di Pietro

Tea: A Delicious Alternative for Late Evenings

10 February 2018

at 22:47 by Social

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If the stimulant, diuretic and antibacterial properties of tea have long been recognized by Chinese medicine, it is only recently that its benefits have been confirmed by modern science. However, there is no longer any doubt that its virtues contribute to our longevity by stimulating the functions of the heart, strengthening the immune system and preventing cell mutations.

Tea, in all its forms, is a healthy, delicious, and original alternatives, even for late evenings. Here are some suggestions from the Camellia Sinensis Tea House:

Tisanes

Discover a world of new fragrances and of different plants such as verbena, raspberry, nettle, wintergreen, hops, lavender, yarrow, and lemon balm as marvellous accompaniments to your late evenings.

White Teas

Clover honey, edible flowers, fresh walnuts, freshly cut grass, are aromas evoked in the sweet and velvety nuances of white teas. With a relatively low caffeine and tannin content, their refreshing infusion is perfect at any time of the day. A tea to enjoy peacefully, without food, to enjoy its finer subtleties and its soothing effect.

Rooibos

Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) from the legume family took its name from the Afrikaans word ‘rooibosch’, meaning red-bush, from the deep red it turns toward the end of its life. Delicious with or without milk!

Iced Teas

Great to satisfy both your thirst and that of your guests! Whether you use a mixture already prepared or benefit from emptying your collection of bags of tea and adding fruits and spices, the procedure is simple. Just add cold water to your preparation at a dosage you would use for a hot infused tea, and allow it to infuse for 6 am to 12 hours in the refrigerator, then filter before tasting!

Mocktails

Camellia Sinensis will participate in Fondation Jean Lapointe’s 28 Days Sober Challenge and will donate $ 1 for every 50g of Shui Xian Lao Cong sold during the month of February.

Wuyi Sunrise

3 oz Shui Xian Lao Cong iced
1 oz fresh pressed clementine juice
1-2 oz soda water (to increase the volume)
A splash of Grenadine syrup

Enjoy!

Wuyi-sunrise-600x398

 
 

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