Infusion Techniques

Teapot Method

A few simple steps will enable you to brew an optimal infusion every time.

Step 1

First, warm the teapot by pouring boiling water onto both the outside (if possible) and inside.

Step 2

Put the tea leaves (on average 1 tsp / 250 ml) into the infusor and put into the teapot. Wait a few seconds, until the leaves soften.

Step 3

Add water at the correct temperature (water too hot 'scalds' the leaves, water that is not hot enough will not release all the flavors).

Step 4

Leave to infuse the required time (usually between 3 and 6 min.), This time varies according to both the tea and your personal taste. The ideal is to taste the tea as it brews. To do this, pour a cup and pour back into the teapot. This crucial step will circulate the liquor and balance the flavors. Now you can taste the tea. Once you are satisfied with the tea, remove the infuser, the tea is ready you can relax and enjoy it.

Step 5

The GAIWAN (zhong) Technique

The Gaiwan is an ancient Chinese technique ideal for tasting white, green, wulong and Pu er teas.

Step 1

Place the leaves in the bottom of gaiwan (1 to 2 tsp or 2.5 g to 5 g).

Step 2

Pour water at the required temperature onto the leaves.

Step 3

Gently stir the leaves using the lid to fully immerse them in the water. For the first infusion, calculate 15 to 45 seconds depending on the tea, then taste by restraining the leaves using the lid.

Step 4

When the infusion is to your liking, pour the liquor into your cup or jug, holding back the leaves with the lid. Repeat, lengthening duration of the infusion each time.

The Gong Fu Cha Technique

"The time of tea" is one interpretation of Gong Fu Cha. It refers to the time and effort that must be invested in order to master this art. This technique is ideal for preparing wulong and Pu Er, it allows multiple infusions of the same leaves, revealing each infusion’s distinctive character. We suggest the use of an aroma cup and another to taste, to enhance your experience.

Step 1

First warm the teapot and the other instruments. Place approximately 2 tsp tea or 5 g of leaves inside the teapot and rinse with water at the same temperature as the infusion.

Step 2

Pour hot water (average 95 ° C) onto the leaves (let it overflow and run down the outside of the teapot), wait 15 to 45 seconds, depending on the desired strength, and at a timely moment pour into a small jug. Be sure to empty the teapot to the last drop to completely stop the infusion.

Step 3

Pour some of the liquor into the aroma cup, which is more elongated, and wait a few seconds.

Step 4

Pour all the liquor into the tasting cup. Take time to enjoy the perfumes in the aroma cup. Then taste the liquor! Thereafter, repeat the steps increasing the duration of each infusion.

The Senchado Technique

The Senchado technique is used for quality Japonese teas, infused in a small Kyusu teapot.

Step 1

Preheat the teapot and cups with hot water then place enough leaves to "carpet" the bottom of the pot (1 to 2 tsp or 2.5 g to 5 g).

Step 2

Pour water at the required temperature (average 75 ° C) into the cups. We suggest using small cups so that the total water volume does not exceed 100 ml.

Step 3

Pour the contents of the cup(s) into the teapot. Make an initial infusion of about 15 to 45 seconds.

Step 4

Pour the tea back into the cup (if using several cups, pour passing from one to another to balance the liquor). Be sure to empty the teapot to the last drop to completely stop the infusion. Repeat with a shorter second infusion then increase the duration of the infusion each time.

Preparing Matcha

Matcha is a very finely ground powdered green tea. It is traditionally used in the Japanese tea ceremony Chanoyu. Here we present a simple way to enjoy this tea at home.

Step 1

To prepare a good matcha, it is necessary to follow some simple but very specific steps. Firstly, take the box of matcha out of the refrigerator half an hour before preparing for it to adjust. Sift the desired amount of matcha. To do this, use a teaspoon to "press" the matcha through a small sieve such as an infuser or flour sifter. The sieving of the matcha makes the foam smoother and prevents the formation of lumps.

Step 2

Reheat your chawan (bowl), empty the water and wipe dry. Put a level teaspoon of sieved tea into the bowl, or two chashaku (matcha spoonfuls). Rinse your chasen (tea whisk) in hot water to soften its strands.

Step 3

Pour 65 ml of water at 75 ° C onto the tea. Matcha is drunk in 3 to 5 sips only.

Step 4

Once you've poured the water, begin to whisk vigorously. Whisk first in the bottom of the bowl, taking care not to crush the strands of the whisk. When the foam begins to form, lift the whisk gently to the surface of tea while continuing to whisk to break up any large bubbles.

Step 5

The tea is served. Traditonally matcha is accompanied with small a sweet treat. Return the unused matcha to the refrigerator. The tea should keep fresh for at least six months.

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