Green Tea
Japan

Sencha Ashikubo Organic

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Product code: CSTV-35
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This tea comes from the magnificent Ashikubo valley and has undergone a long drying process.

What results is a clear, mild liquor that is slightly fruitier and toastier than other generally more herbaceous Sencha. Secondary aromas of corn, mango, hazelnuts and parsley make it an ideal tea for anyone starting to discover Japanese teas.

  • Cultivar: Yabukita
  • Producer: M. Yoshimoto
  • Altitude: 150m
  • Date of harvest: May 8, 2021
Try this tea first
Teapot method
balance Quantity / 250ml of water
1
thermometer Temperature of infusion
75
lined-clock Infusion length
3 - 4 min
Senchado technique
balance Quantity / 250ml of water
1.5
thermometer Temperature of infusion
75
lined-clock Infusion length 1
20 - 40 sec
lined-clock Infusion length 2
5 - 10 sec
lined-clock Infusion length 3
15 - 30 sec
Concentration in caffeine 48 MgConcentration in mg / cup* of tea, on a four-grade scale
48 Mg
48 Mg
Concentration of antioxydants 900 μmolConcentration in μmol / cup* of tea, on a four-grade scale
900 μmol
900 μmol
Flavour wheel To better identify the aromatic notes of each tea
Floral Fruity Wooded Earthy Spice Vegetal
* 250ml loose teas, 100ml for Matchas

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