Japan

Japan has a long tradition of very high quality pottery. The teapots produced there are refined and commonplace items.

Kyusu from Murata | M3

This teapot was created by the Japanese ceramist Yoshiki Murata. The workshop of this potter is located in the coastal town of Tokoname in Aichi Prefecture. Turned by hand, this object is made with local clay. The patterns on the sides are created by applying seaweed to the clay at the moment of firing.

Kyusu from Murata | M4

The workshop of Yoshiki Murata is located in the coastal town of Tokoname in Aichi Prefecture and, turned by hand, this object is made with local clay. Mr Murata is what we consider a “ceramics innovator”. With more than 35 years of ceramics under his belt, he is still very passionate about exploring new clays, new forms and new methods of firing. The hammered finish on this piece is one of Mr. Murata most recognizable artistic signature.

Kyusu Niwa | Bara

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu Niwa | Sumire

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu | Kamo

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu | Kotori

This tiny teapot perfectly embodies the Sencha-do technique of infusing tea one cup at a time. Explore the subtleties of your favourite tea with this discreet, cream-colored Kyusu teapot.

Kyusu | Moko

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu | Opal

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country. In Japanese, Kyusu simply means a "teapot". The people are fond of green tea, traditional teapots have features that optimize the tasting of this tea family while remaining beneficial for other teas. In fact, in addition to offering a comfortable grip thanks to its side handle, the fine-mesh filter easily holds in the finest leaves.

Kyusu | Také

Of Japanese manufacture, Senchado teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu | Tako

Of Japanese manufacture, Senchado teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu | Yèsi

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country.

Oitomi Cast Iron Teapot | Fur

The Japanese company Oitomi is now in exclusive Canadian sales at Camellia Sinensis. This foundry offers us this classical teapot, in a style both contemporary and respectful of a craft tradition several centuries old in Japan.

Sensu Men

This fan is used by the participants of the Chanoyu tea ceremony. It is placed as an honorary sign in front of the knees of the participants as they are greeted. This fan remain closed in the tea room and its shape represents the sword that the samuraï placed aside before entering the tea room. It is made of white bamboo and paper. Men use a slightly longer fan than that used by Women.

Sensu Women | Aka

This fan is used by the participants of the Chanoyu tea ceremony. It is placed as an honorary sign in front of the knees of the participants as they are greeted. This fan remain closed in the tea room and its shape represents the sword that the samuraï placed aside before entering the tea room. It is made of white bamboo and paper. Women use a slightly smaller fan than that used by men.

Shiboridashi from Hakusan Katamaya | Midori

Third generation potter, Hakusan began work in Tokoname nearly 50 years ago.

Wazuqu Cast iron Teapot | Mayu

With more than four centuries of experience at their craft, the Kikuchi Hojudo foundry is a true leader in Wazuqu steel (a Japanese steel of very high quality).