Japan

Japan has a long tradition of very high quality pottery. The teapots produced there are refined and commonplace items.

per page

Chakoshi Aka

This box is ideal for sieving matcha before use. The set contains a fine stainless steel sieve and a metal spatula. Sieving the matcha becomes a simple task with this utensil. It will enable you to prepare a bowl of matcha tea with a fine creamy froth.  

Chakoshi | Midori

This box is ideal for sieving matcha before use. The set contains a fine stainless steel sieve and a metal spatula. Sieving the matcha becomes a simple task with this utensil. It will enable you to prepare a bowl of matcha tea with a fine creamy froth.  

Chawan Raku | Kuro

Made by hand without a wheel, Raku works have evolved with this precious and artisanal touch that follows the aesthetic concept of Wabi-sabi.

Chawan | Hotto

This black Chawan seduces us with its naïve details that bring its classic look to life. A pleasure to use with a slightly curled lip and the thumb groove for the thumb, while a contrasting glaze reminiscent of the Tenmoku pleases the eye.

Chawan | Zuma

Would you like to know more about this product?  We will add a full description soon so watch this space.

Fukusa Men

This Fukusa is made of mauve silk, the colour traditionly associated with men in the tea ceremony, as in Urasenke school. This object is used in preparation of matcha to purify instruments during the chanoyu tea ceremony.

Fukusa Women

This Fukusa is made of red silk, the colour traditionly associated with women in the tea ceremony, as in Urasenke school. This object is used in preparation of matcha to purify instruments during the chanoyu tea ceremony.

Japanese Teapot | Fuji

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style. The filter is easily removed making this teapot a complete solution for your infusions that adds a touch of elegance. 

Kaishi Women

These squares of paper are used by the participants of the chanoyu tea ceremony. They are used to deposit pastries served during the tea ceremony, as well as to clean the edge of the chawan when serving Koïcha, a thick tea made a large quantity of matcha. Men use larger Kaishi than those used by women.

Kyusu from Ito Gafu | G1

With complete dedication to his craft, Ito Gafu has become an inspiration to the Tokoname artisan community. 

Kyusu from Ito Gafu | G2

With complete dedication to his craft, Ito Gafu has become an inspiration to the Tokoname artisan community. 

Kyusu from Mr. Ito | Ito1

We love Mr. Ito's creation for its finesse, unique form, and its rustic grey-white urban clay. A craft Japanese teapot with a unique style of chic.

Kyusu from Mr. Ito | Ito2

We love Mr. Ito's creation for its finesse, unique form, and its rustic grey-white urban clay. A craft Japanese teapot with a unique style of chic

Kyusu from Mr. Ito | Ito3

This Japanese craft piece embodies nature at its finest. It feels as if Mr. Ito carved this unique teapot from a piece of stone. Rich in simplicity.

Kyusu from Mr. Ito | Ito5

We love Mr. Ito's creation for its finesse, unique form, and its rustic grey-white urban clay. A craft Japanese teapot with a unique style of chic

Kyusu from Mr. Ito | Ito6

We love Mr. Ito's creation for its finesse, unique form, and its rustic grey-white urban clay. A craft Japanese teapot with a unique style of chic

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Hinata

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Shoku

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Y1

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Y2

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Y3

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Y4

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Youkou

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Murata | M10

Yoshiki Murata is an extremely dynamic potter, still very driven by his exploration of firing, clays and minerals, even after more than 30 years of work.

Previous
  • 1
  • 2
Next