Other collections

Discover our collection of teapots.

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Kyusu | Moko

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu | Kamo

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu from Shôryû | Hono

Shôryû speaks passionately about his craft and how the concept of pleasure plays such a large part in the philosophy behind creations.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Youkou

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Y7

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Y6

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Y5

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kaishi Women

These squares of paper are used by the participants of the chanoyu tea ceremony. They are used to deposit pastries served during the tea ceremony, as well as to clean the edge of the chawan when serving Koïcha, a thick tea made a large quantity of matcha. Men use larger Kaishi than those used by women.

Japanese Teapot | Pavot

Japanese porcelain teapot in a practical format, embellished with the silhouettes of bright red flowers.

Japanese Teapot | Mara

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style. 

Japanese Teapot | Kawaii

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style.

Fukusa Women

This Fukusa is made of red silk, the colour traditionly associated with women in the tea ceremony, as in Urasenke school. This object is used in preparation of matcha to purify instruments during the chanoyu tea ceremony.

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