Other collections

Discover our collection of teapots.

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Chakoshi | Inox

This box is ideal for sieving matcha before use. The set contains a fine stainless steel sieve and a metal spatula. Sieving the matcha becomes a simple task with this utensil. It will enable you to prepare a bowl of matcha tea with a fine creamy froth.  

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Chawan | Tsuru

Cranes taking flight in front of Mount Fuji at sunset; this is a typical Japanese image that embellish on this emblematic chawan.

Fukusa Men

This Fukusa is made of mauve silk, the colour traditionly associated with men in the tea ceremony, as in Urasenke school. This object is used in preparation of matcha to purify instruments during the chanoyu tea ceremony.

Fukusa Women

This Fukusa is made of red silk, the colour traditionly associated with women in the tea ceremony, as in Urasenke school. This object is used in preparation of matcha to purify instruments during the chanoyu tea ceremony.

Kaishi Women

These squares of paper are used by the participants of the chanoyu tea ceremony. They are used to deposit pastries served during the tea ceremony, as well as to clean the edge of the chawan when serving Koïcha, a thick tea made a large quantity of matcha. Men use larger Kaishi than those used by women.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Iwa

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Kaisou

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Shudei Mogusa

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Suyaki

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Youkou

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Kyusu from Murata | M9

This teapot was created by the Japanese ceramist Yoshiki Murata. The workshop of this potter is located in the coastal town of Tokoname in Aichi Prefecture. Turned by hand, this object is made with local clay. The patterns on the sides are created by applying seaweed to the clay at the moment of firing.

Wazuqu Cast iron Teapot | Mayu

With more than four centuries of experience at their craft, the Kikuchi Hojudo foundry is a true leader in Wazuqu steel (a Japanese steel of very high quality).

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