Quebec

More and more local artisans are producing high-quality teapots. Camellia Sinensis has always supported the work of Quebec potters.

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Chawan from Julie Lavoie | Tenmoku

 Quebec-born ceramist Julie Lavoie discovered Tenmoku for the first time in a Japanese tea room.

Naoshi (Chasen Holder) from Julie Lavoie | Tenmoku

An almost essential accessory for anyone using a chasen, the naoshi (chasen-holder )preserves the shape of the whisk while enabling it to dry properly.

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Naoshi (Chasen Holder) from Julie Lavoie | Verano

An almost essential accessory for anyone using a chasen, the naoshi (chasen-holder) preserves the shape of the whisk while enabling it to dry properly.

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Naoshi (Chasen Holder) from Makiko | Vanille

An almost essential accessory for anyone using a chasen, the naoshi (chasen-holder) preserves the shape of the whisk while enabling it to dry properly. In fact, drying a chasen upside down with the handle on a table increases the  risk of surplus moisture in the base, where the fine fronds bind to the bamboo handle.

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Teapot from Makiko | Vanille

The distinct finish on these elegant pieces is created using a clay powder in the glaze.

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