Senchado

The senchado technique is used for the great Japanese teas that are infused in a kyusu teapot of small volume.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Hanabira

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Hebi

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Ishi

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Kitte

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Shudei Mogusa

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Suyaki

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Yama

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Kyusu from Murata | M2

This teapot was created by the Japanese ceramist Yoshiki Murata. The workshop of this potter is located in the coastal town of Tokoname in Aichi Prefecture. Turned by hand, this object is made with local clay. The patterns on the sides are created by applying seaweed to the clay at the moment of firing.

Kyusu from Murata | M3

This teapot was created by the Japanese ceramist Yoshiki Murata. The workshop of this potter is located in the coastal town of Tokoname in Aichi Prefecture. Turned by hand, this object is made with local clay. The patterns on the sides are created by applying seaweed to the clay at the moment of firing.

Kyusu from Murata | M4

The workshop of Yoshiki Murata is located in the coastal town of Tokoname in Aichi Prefecture and, turned by hand, this object is made with local clay. Mr Murata is what we consider a “ceramics innovator”. With more than 35 years of ceramics under his belt, he is still very passionate about exploring new clays, new forms and new methods of firing. The hammered finish on this piece is one of Mr. Murata most recognizable artistic signature.

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Kyusu from Murata | M6

The workshop of Yoshiki Murata is located in the coastal town of Tokoname in Aichi Prefecture and, turned by hand, this object is made with local clay. Mr Murata is what we consider a “ceramics innovator”. With more than 35 years of ceramics under his belt, he is still very passionate about exploring new clays, new forms and new methods of firing. The hammered finish on this piece is one of Mr. Murata most recognizable artistic signature.

Kyusu | Kotori

This tiny teapot perfectly embodies the Sencha-do technique of infusing tea one cup at a time. Explore the subtleties of your favourite tea with this discreet, cream-colored Kyusu teapot.

Kyusu | Kuri Iro

This plum color Kyusu of beautiful simplicity.

Kyusu | Také

Of Japanese manufacture, Senchado teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu | Tako

Of Japanese manufacture, Senchado teapots are typical of the country.

Shiboridashi from Hakusan Katamaya | Midori

Third generation potter, Hakusan began work in Tokoname nearly 50 years ago.

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