Teapots and rituals

Teapots, matcha accessories, gaiwan, gong fu cha teapots, senchado and everything you need to preapre tea.

per page

Kaishi Women

These squares of paper are used by the participants of the chanoyu tea ceremony. They are used to deposit pastries served during the tea ceremony, as well as to clean the edge of the chawan when serving Koïcha, a thick tea made a large quantity of matcha. Men use larger Kaishi than those used by women.

Sensu Men

This fan is used by the participants of the chanoyu tea ceremony. It is placed as an honorary sign in front of the knees of the participants as they are greeted. This fan remain closed in the tea room and its shape represents the sword that the samuraï placed aside before entering the tea room. It is made of white bamboo and paper. Men use a slightly longer fan than that used by Women.

Chakoshi | Midori

This box is ideal for sieving matcha before use. The set contains a fine stainless steel sieve and a metal spatula. Sieving the matcha becomes a simple task with this utensil. It will enable you to prepare a bowl of matcha tea with a fine creamy froth.  

Japanese Teapot | Opal

Japanese ceramic teapot with a deep blue finish that easily blends with any decor.

Kyusu | Opal

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country. In Japanese, Kyusu simply means a "teapot". The people are fond of green tea, traditional teapots have features that optimize the tasting of this tea family while remaining beneficial for other teas. In fact, in addition to offering a comfortable grip thanks to its side handle, the fine-mesh filter easily holds in the finest leaves.

Naoshi (Chasen Holder) from Julie Lavoie | Tenmoku

An almost essential accessory for anyone using a chasen, the naoshi (chasen-holder )preserves the shape of the whisk while enabling it to dry properly.

Japanese Teapot | Petale

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style.

The filter is easily removed making this teapot a complete solution for your infusions that adds a touch of elegance. 

Diameter of the opening: 5.75 cm 

Height: 12 cm

Chawan | Zuma

Would you like to know more about this product?  We will add a full description soon so watch this space.

Japanese Teapot | Mara

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style. 

Japanese Teapot | Pavot

Japanese porcelain teapot in a practical format, embellished with the silhouettes of bright red flowers.

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style.

The filter is easily removed making this teapot a complete solution for your infusions that adds a touch of elegance. 

Diameter of the opening: 8.25 cm 

Height: 10.25 cm

Japanese Teapot | Fuji

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style.

Japanese Teapot | Kawaii

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style.

The filter is easily removed making this teapot a complete solution for your infusions that adds a touch of elegance. 

Diameter of the opening: 8.25 cm 

Height: 10.25 cm

Japanese Teapot | Koneko

Japanese porcelain teapot brightened up with a few felines motifs for the cat lover in you.

An interesting fusion of English traditional references and Japanese style.

The filter is easily removed making this teapot a complete solution for your infusions that adds a touch of elegance. 

Diameter of the opening: 8.25 cm 

Height: 10.25 cm

Kyusu | Kuri Iro

This plum color Kyusu of beautiful simplicity.

Fukusa Men

This Fukusa is made of mauve silk, the colour traditionly associated with men in the tea ceremony, as in Urasenke school. This object is used in preparation of matcha to purify instruments during the chanoyu tea ceremony.

Fukusa Women

This Fukusa is made of red silk, the colour traditionly associated with women in the tea ceremony, as in Urasenke school. This object is used in preparation of matcha to purify instruments during the chanoyu tea ceremony.

Kyusu | Yèsi

Of Japanese manufacture, Kyusu teapots are typical of the country.

Kyusu from Gyokko | Kitte

At the venerable age of 80, Japanese ceramist Gyokko is still an active artist whose energy do not seem to fade. He manages to keep in artistic vision: offering teapots that are both affordable, artisanal and complex.

Chakoshi | Inox

This box is ideal for sieving matcha before use. The set contains a fine stainless steel sieve and a metal spatula. Sieving the matcha becomes a simple task with this utensil. It will enable you to prepare a bowl of matcha tea with a fine creamy froth.  

Kyusu from Shôryû | Eko

 

Kyusu from Shôryû | Hono

Shôryû speaks passionately about his craft and how the concept of pleasure plays such a large part in the philosophy behind creations.

This pearlescent finish is unique to Tokoname, a flagship city of ceramic production in Japan. This glaze carries the same name Shôryû Tenmoku. It took many years of careful research to achieve these spectacular results. Clearly a precious and carefully guarded art.

Despite international success, he prefers to keep his work affordable. A potter should create teapots that bring light and life to daily routine. why produce work that remains lifeless and …

Wazuqu Cast Iron Teapot | Yoho

With more than four centuries of experience at their craft, the Kikuchi Hojudo foundry is a true leader in Wazuqu steel (a Japanese steel of very high quality).

Chawan Raku | Kuro

Made by hand without a wheel, Raku works have evolved with this precious and artisanal touch that follows the aesthetic concept of Wabi-sabi.

Kyusu from Mr. Yamada | Youkou

There are a rare few adamant potters in Tokoname that still insist on mastering every step of the artisanal process, taking it as far as making their own clay. Yamada is one of these potters.

Previous
  • 1
  • 2
Next