Taiwan

Taiwan produces a large majority of wulong teas. The center of the island is made up of high mountains and the gardens are among the highest in the world.

Ali Shan 1999 (Charcoal Roast)

Plucked by hand and aged since 1999 by successive charcoal roasting, this high mountain tea offers an infusion with glossy black leaves and warm fragrances. Its liquor is rounded, velvety and deploys a broad range of aromatic nuances, with accents through woods and vanilla to notes of iodine (seaweed) and empyreumatics (coffee, caramel). The finish is gentle and deep.

Bai Hao 2008

Aged for almost ten years, this wulong from Mr. Xu is sure to charm all admirers with the scent of brown sugar that emanates from its blend of whole leaves and fine silver buds. In infusion flavours of bark and roasted coffee dominate the aromatic spectrum. Its liquor, clear and mineral, retains a certain vitality despite its years of dormancy. Buckwheat (honey) and butter caramel notes enhance the slightly spicy pastry aspect of this tea from the North West of Taiwan.

Sun Moon Lake T-18

Here is a rare black tea from Taiwan, made using the well known T-18 cultivar which is derived from a cross between a large leafed tea from Burma (Ashamu) and a wild tea tree from southern Taiwan. Infused, its graceful leaves emanate smooth aromas of wintergreen, malt and tobacco. Lightly mentholated and generously fruity with notes of prune and raisin, its liquor is round, full and silky. A perfect tea for those special mornings.

Sun Moon Lake T-18 2010

Though still very uncommon, aging black tea is slowly picking up as a trend. When we consider the depth 8 years of Taiwanese storage has given this tea it must me a good thing.

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