Wulong Tea

Wulongs are partially oxidized. By varying the degrees of oxidation, a greener (floral and vegetable) or more black (wooded, fruity, roasted) wulong can be obtained.

per page

Competition Bai Hao 2 Flowers | Collection Box

Amateurs of exceptional tea, here is one of three recent batches coming to us from the annual Bai Hao competition in Taiwan. This one, nominated 2 flowers, as it is the case for about 20 to 25% of the 2000 lots judged, presents beautiful leaves adorned with sumptuous buds. Once infused, they display seductive scents of flowers (orange blossom) and pastries, charging the air with their aromatic power. Its succulent liquor, honeyed and woody, boasts soft resins (cedar), spices (nutmeg) and acidic fruit notes, evoking watermelon in its finale. Like quality teas, this one offers multiple deep and …

Gaba Cha

A surprising black wulong from the North of Taiwan. A varied dry leaf gives an deep amber cup with a spicy and fruity nose. Full flavour is sweet with edges of cooked apple and grenadine. Notes of cinnamon bark and nutmeg add to a floral and fruity persistence.

Anxi Tie Guan Yin

Legendary rolled wulong from Fujian (China), Tie Guan Yin (Iron Goddess of Mercy) is one of the country’s best representatives. Its sharp, sweet taste and its characteristic flowery aromas (lilacs and lilies) made it a favorite both East and West. This particularly aromatic harvest comes from M. Zhang Guo Hua’s gardens, in the mountainous region of Anxi. Grown in altitude, his tea bursts with intensity.

Mi Lan Xiang Wudong Daan 150 years old single tea tree | Collection Box

The Feng Huang Mountains of China produce a few wulongs from single tea trees.

Dong Ding Competition Special Mention #5 | Collection Box

We are proud to offer you this lot that has received an Honourable Mention in at the annual Luku competition. This lot was ranked in the top 10 teas  of 6000. Its golden liqueur is sweet and full, combined with its slightly acidulous notes. Sweet hints of pineapple and candied fruit, oatmeal cookies and almond butter. The whole experience is supported by well integrated tannins and a bright briskness. This masterpiece builds towards a long finale where floral and fruity accents dominate. A gem for the lucky few!

Ali Shan

From the mountain of Ali Shan, Taiwan, this high altitude wulong is one of our grand classics. A sweet and fruity liquor has notes of coconut strong floral aroma with an edge of vanilla.

Jin Shuan

Produced in Taiwan, Jin Shuan is the original “cream wulong”. This cultivar is single handedly responsible for the explosion of milk additives on today’s tea markets. Enjoyed by Taiwanese for its creamy texture and buttery aromas, we offer it here in its simplest form, void of any augmented flavours. You’ll find refreshing flowery notes (lily, dandelions) alongside vanilla overtones and, perhaps, a subtle spicy finish (cinnamon, nutmeg). All famously coated in this thick and syrupy texture.

Mucha Tie Guan Yin (roasted)

Produced in the Mucha region, this high grade of Taiwanese Tie Guan Yin was entered into competitions by its producer. Fragrances of coffee, candied fruit and Turkish apricots. The remarkable lingering aftertaste makes this an exceptional tea.

Dong Ding Mr Nen Yu (Roasted)

The expertise of M.Nen Yu is doubly honored here with this tasty cooking of Dong Ding. The dark khaki leaves exhibit from their infusion intoxicating fragrances of berries (raspberry jam), honey and toast. Its liquor, rich and creamy, reveals a nice balance between its wooded and vegetal aspects. This generous tea also features an exotic finish of pineapple and flowers.

Ali Shan 1999 (Charcoal Roast)

Plucked by hand and aged since 1999 by successive charcoal roasting, this high mountain tea offers an infusion with glossy black leaves and warm fragrances. Its liquor is rounded, velvety and deploys a broad range of aromatic nuances, with accents through woods and vanilla to notes of iodine (seaweed) and empyreumatics (coffee, caramel). The finish is gentle and deep.

Si Ji Chun

Brought back from the mountains in Nantou region (Taiwan), this pearl shaped green wulong is one of today’s most popular industry standards. Highly polyvalent and adaptive cultivar, the Si Ji Chun produces intense aromas whether it is grown in low or high altitude. It is no surprise to find it today in gardens all over the world. Much appreciated from daily consumers for its low caffeine levels and its generous flowery bouquet (lilac, freesia), this particular wulong easily steeps and resteeps as the day goes by.

Dong Ding Mr Chang

Over the years, wulongs from Dong Ding Mountain have made quite a name for themselves. Grown in high-altitude, shorter daylight and greater temperature variations concentrate the aromatic oils in the slow budding leaves. They are well known amongst tea enthusiasts for their creamy texture and buttery taste.

Previous
Next