Wulong Tea

Wulongs are partially oxidized. By varying the degrees of oxidation, a greener (floral and vegetable) or more black (wooded, fruity, roasted) wulong can be obtained.

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Si Ji Chun (Tea Box)

This tea pack contains our

Shui Xian Lao Cong M.Liu | Collection Box

Here is a great production not to be missed, originating in the Wuyi mountains national park, one of the best terroirs for tea production due to the quality of its volcanic soils and its most favorable warm and humid microclimate. Infusion of its beautiful leaves, transformed by the hands of masters, offers intoxicating perfumes of sweet ripe strawberries and flowers. Its brilliant liquor is creamy and displays its woody and roasted accents with finesse, leaving room for precious nuances of sweet spices (nutmeg, cinnamon) and brown sugar. Generous and balanced, could make a nice gift!

Shui Xian Lao Cong

Harvested from mature tea plants with roots deeply embedded in the terroir of the Wuyi Mountains, this roasted black wulong offers rich woody and fruity aromas enhanced by its generous presence.

Shan Lin Xi

Initial impression from this taiwanese highland wulong is an aroma of ground-cherry and wheat-grass which evolves into fresh vanilla and flowers. Rich creamy texture with sweet final notes of coconut.

Rou Gui Ma Tou Mr Liu

The Ma Tou (“horse head”) section in Wuyi National Park is known to produce some of the best Rou Gui in the World. This type of Wulong, harvested near the strange rock formation, is amongst the most sought after in China.

Rou Gui de M. Wu

Due to its typical terroir, the Wuyi Mountains region produces teas known as "rock teas" including the famous Rou Gui. The infusion of its large twists liberates warm notes of bark, spices and roasted nuts. Its lively and fruity (green apple) liquor evolves towards a finish marked by the mildly spicy flavor of Chinese cinnamon, a literal translation of Rou Gui!

Qi Lan Xiang

Rolled into thin twists, true to the style of Guangdong, this wulong  has, however, been roasted only once (rather than twice) preserving its greenness and its distinctly floral aromatic bouquet. Its liquor thrusts its vegetal and sweet (fried courgette) character, embellished with rich nuances of fresh cream and coconut. Its finish is thirst-quenching and shows a tangy edge evoking pineapple. Also an excellent ice tea!

Qi Lan Wuyi

The Wuyi Mountain, Fujian version of this famous Chinese wulong. Infused leaf gives a generous fruity perfume with woody and floral notes. The smooth, slightly sweet liquor has a delicat vegetal astringence with elements of grilled nuts and spices. A well-balanced tea with full and refreshing aftertaste.

Pinglin Bao Zhong

Situated in the north of the island, to the south of the capital, the town of Pinglin remains true to the traditional style of "Bao Zhong" with the leaves rolled lengthways into twists. Velvety and slightly saline, the liquor is vegetal (spinach) enhanced with accents of tomatoes and spices. The evolution of flavours and mouthfeel is dynamic with a persistent finish refined with citrus (clementine) and flowers.

Mi Lan Xiang Wudong Daan 150 years old single tea tree | Collection Box

The Feng Huang Mountains of China produce a few wulongs from single tea trees.

Mi Lan Xiang Feng Xi (Tea Box)

This tea pack contains our

Mi Lan Xiang Feng Xi

This dark wulong from the Phoenix Mountains (Feng Huang) is a true classic in modern Dan Cong style. From the well-known Fengxi village, the Mi Lan Xiang cultivar (litt. “Honey Orchid Fragrance”) really is the flagship of the genre.

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