Wulong Tea

Wulongs are partially oxidized. By varying the degrees of oxidation, a greener (floral and vegetable) or more black (wooded, fruity, roasted) wulong can be obtained.

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Tong Tian Xiang

Making its first apparition on our list this year, this dark wulong from the Phoenix Mountains (Feng Huang) is named after its cultivar, the Tong Tian Xiang (litt. “Heaven’s scent”).

Si Ji Chun (Tea Box)

Much appreciated from daily consumers for its low caffeine levels and its generous flowery bouquet (lilac, freesia), this particular wulong easily steeps and resteeps as the day goes by.

Si Ji Chun (bag of 50 teabags)

Now offered in individual teabags, our Si Ji Chun contains the same Taiwanese wulong tea leaves as our loose leaf Si Ji Chun.

Si Ji Chun

Brought back from the mountains in Nantou region (Taiwan), this pearl shaped green wulong is one of today’s most popular industry standards.

Shui Xian Lao Cong

Harvested from mature tea plants with roots deeply embedded in the terroir of the Wuyi Mountains, this roasted black wulong offers rich woody and fruity aromas enhanced by its generous presence.

Shan Lin Xi

The mountain of Shan Lin Xi is steep and imposing, highly exposed to the natural elements. Its wild character seems to be reflected in the tea produced in this region.

Rou Gui Mituoyan Mr. Wu

Mituoyan is located in the Wuyishan National Park (Wuyi Mountains) in China’s Fujian Province, making this Rou Gui a Zheng Yan tea. This specific volcanic terroir, has made its reputation with a style of Wulong teas, known as "rock teas”.

Grand cru

Rou Gui Ma Tou Mr. Liu

The Ma Tou (“horse head”) section in Wuyi National Park is known to produce some of the best Rou Gui in the World.

Qi Lan Wuyi

The Wuyi Mountain, Fujian version of this famous Chinese wulong.

New

Pinglin Bao Zhong

Situated in the north of the island, to the south of the capital, the town of Pinglin remains true to the traditional style of "Bao Zhong" with the leaves rolled lengthways into twists.

New

Mucha Tie Guan Yin 1996

Produced in Mucha near the capital of Taiwan, this tea has typically been cooked 60 hours before being aged for over 20 years. Its producer, Mr. Gao, who also prepares this tea in his harvest of the year, is highly skilled in these two transformation processes and his attention to detail gives an exceptional vintage.

New

Mucha Tie Guan Yin (roasted)

Planted in around 1875 in the Mucha region, this wulong is unique to the Taiwanese archipelago. M. Gao presents his marvellous version of the Iron Goddess of Mercy (Tie Guan Yin).

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